Trying WordPress and the Sin50

I’m just getting into blogging, and so I am still trying to decide where I want to go with it all. For this reason, I am trying out WordPress rather than Blogger. I think it will be a great match for me. As a computer science student, WordPress gives me a few more options to fiddle with the technology, which is what I really enjoy. Now to move on to the  matter at hand: a great quilt that my girlfriend, Anna, helped me make back in May.

I call this project Sin 50 because of the synthetic insulation. Also, when I started looking into using synthetic insulation, it felt almost sinful to leave down. Down has many great qualities as an insulator, including a long life, low volume, and low weight. However, after using my 2.5oz Apex quilt for the summer, I can absolutely see times where ditching the down is acceptable, especially when someone is on a tight budget.

The Sin25 (using the Apex 2.5) is a simple flat quilt with a velcro footbox and came in at a final weight of 13.1 oz.  MLD used to rate their similar quilt down to 45*, which I find to be pretty true. To add functionality to this quilt, and to make it work with my summer SUL kit, I decided to insert a head slit and make it a wearable quilt. I’ve always found it very odd that only JRB makes wearable quilts (that I know of), and they only use down insulation. Hiking in the Southeast in the summer means plenty of rain but warmer temps ad high humidity, and so having a quilt that would work well when slightly damp, dry quickly, and could act as my sole insulation both walking around camp and sleeping, was very important. The total combination was amazing, and became my first choice in insulation throughout the summer. However, because I made it just a bit too small, I decided to sell it and try again and share the steps I took in making it. The pictures I take along the way will probably be a combination of projects. I’m currently making two quilts. One Sin50 for myself, but also one custom Sin25 using silk as a liner and M90 for the shell for a friend. Just because of contrasting colors, the silk and M90 may be my choice of pictures, but both quilts will be made in the same manner, so this will not matter.

This new quilt will be made using 5oz Apex to prepare for the coming shoulder season here. The features will include:

  • 74″ L x 50″ W at the shoulder and 38″ W at the feet.
  • Drawcord footbox
  • 20″ long velco/button closure for the footbox
  • Neck drawcord and snap
  • Head slit with velcro closure
  • Grosgrain loops for attaching shockcord straps on the bottom
  • 1.1oz breathable ripstop nylon shell and liner

Materials Needed:

Purchased from DIYGearSupply

Note: for anyone using fabric that is not at least 60″ wide, you will need to buy five yards of fabric. Less than 60″ wide is simply not long enough to sew pieces together to get the desired results.
Purchased from Thru-Hiker

Total cost (with shipping) approximately $65

Along with these materials, you will also need a sewing machine, marking utensils, scissors, sewing pins, and a hand needle.

Part of this project was providing myself, and my friends who want to start going UL with an inexpensive option for using a quilt. For this reason, the yardages of the above materials are as low as possible, using a combination of materials that I find to be high performing, but easy on your pocket. Also, it should be noted that 2 yards of insulation creates a quilt only 72″ long, which is a bit short for many people, but this problem will be tackled later by stitching extra insulation together. Depending on the width of the fabric you are using, this should work perfectly well for up to an almost 80″ long quilt.

I’m currently only waiting for supplies to arrive, so I am hoping by posting this more or less in sections, I will be motivated to continue working at a good pace. So, stay tuned for the next few steps, the pattern and any set up steps, sometime next week.

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